#TuesdaySerial Report – Vol 4, Week 29 – Nov 12, 2013

November 15, 2013

We had a strong turnout for Tuesday Serial this week: 36 new serial installments for your reading pleasure. This includes a debut from AC Gregory: “He Lies At My Front Door.”

Did you catch our Tuesday Serial guest post last week? “The Five-Step No-Guarantees WebSerial Marketing Plan” by Nick Bryan.

No matter what genres you love, there’s something for you in this week’s offerings. If you’d rather read only completed serials, you’ll find some in our Graduates section (above). In our Hall of Fame, you can find serials that have been subsequently published – make an author happy and go buy one! As always, if you have questions, just let us know!

WRITERS: Do you have news to share in next week’s report? Have an idea for a guest blog post? Did your serial get published? Have some other news for everyone? Shoot us an e.mail (tuesdayserial@tuesdayserial.com) or a DM (@tuesdayserial) so we can share the good news!

As always, if you happen to spot any mistakes or broken links in this week’s TuesdaySerial report, let us know! Happy reading (and writing!).


This linky list is now closed.

#TuesdaySerial Report – Vol 4, Week 28 – Nov 5, 2013

November 7, 2013

Tuesday Serial had another great turnout this week: 44 new serial installments for your reading pleasure. This includes the debuts of The Graystone Saga by Laura Klotz, The Unexpected by Jiovaan Chetty, and The Rules Change by John Bahler. Welcome aboard, Laura, Jiovaan, and John!

No matter what genres you love, there’s something for you in this week’s offerings. If you’d rather read only completed serials, you’ll find some in our Graduates section (above). In our Hall of Fame, you can find serials that have been subsequently published – make an author happy and go buy one! As always, if you have questions, just let us know!

WRITERS: Do you have news to share in next week’s report? Have an idea for a guest blog post? Did your serial get published? Have some other news for everyone? Shoot us an e.mail (tuesdayserial@tuesdayserial.com) or a DM (@tuesdayserial) so we can share the good news!

As always, if you happen to spot any mistakes or broken links in this week’s TuesdaySerial report, let us know! Happy reading (and writing!).


This linky list is now closed.

“The Five-Step No-Guarantees WebSerial Marketing Plan” by Nick Bryan

November 7, 2013

We are pleased to welcome Tuesday Serial contributor Nick Bryan to the Tuesday Serial site today for the fifth installment in our guest post series. Nick is sharing some of his experience in marketing serial fiction – learned the hard way! We will be featuring guest posts every other week through December 20. You can view previous posts in the series hereWelcome, Nick!


nickbryancover-smallI’ve been a webserial author for nine months now, and the hard part is always this: you put your story online, on your own site, Jukepop Serials or Wattpad, and suddenly there’s pressure to get people reading the damn thing. After all, you spent ages on it, so people should see it! Not to mention, all the other web authors seem to drench the internet with a waterfall of excitable promotion, so how do you keep up?

I don’t pretend to be an expert – otherwise I’d be rich by now – but I’ve been battling the promotional peaks (“YES GOOD REVIEWS AND SHINY STARS!”) and troughs (“OH GOD THE NUMBERS WON’T MOVE NO MATTER HOW MUCH I TWEET!”) long enough to have a few thoughts. Here, in blog-friendly list form, are the insights I’ve gathered.

1) Consistency is king

Sadly, no amount of tweeting can replace writing a decent quality serial and getting it out on time. I often worry later chapters of my serial are better than the early ones, and this early lack of consistency might let me down. Is it against the spirit of serials to go back and punch them up? I’m seriously considering it.

2) I tweet, therefore I spam

Twitter is handy in the modern world of plugging your serial fiction, but decent targeted advertising is worth considering – especially without an existing audience; tweet-and-hope can only go so far. Some serials have grown massive without any Twitter presence; put yourself out there on sites devoted to webfiction. TuesdaySerial is a good start – try Web Fiction Guide next.

3) At least it isn’t a novel

I mean, imagine having to advertise week-in, week-out for the exact same thing. At least webserials have new chapters, so we authors can say we’re pushing fresh material. People out there with whole novels to sell, I envy you not; you have a harder task than me.

4) Review your fear of reviews

Having your baby reviewed is scary, and nothing more gratifying than a mighty geyser of praise. By the same token, seeing it crushed with a hammer is true pain. Unfortunately, it’s all part of the unspoken deal you signed when you released your work into the wild. There’s no benefit in letting it get to you or (even worse) throwing a public tantrum, so try to identify valid criticisms in less good reviews, learn and move on.

5) Writing is work is life is pain

It’s easy to get distracted from the actual writing by all the things I just mentioned. They are meant to be ways of getting the writing out there, which probably comes back to point 1 – produce something decent, first and foremost, and set update targets you can meet without destroying the rest of your life.

And then, if you’ve got time, maybe plug it on Twitter or a forum, write a blog post, that kind of thing. If your serial catches on and a larger audience appears, the rest will probably follow. Now, I’m off to schedule some tweets. If you have any alternative thoughts on marketing and such, let me know below.



nickbryan-squared-smallNick Bryan writes the comedy-drama detective serial Hobson & Choi on Jukepop Serials. He also has various novels and short stories on the go, as well as his Twitter account. Nick is British and enjoys sleep, comedy and a nice white beer. More details on his blog.

#TuesdaySerial Report – Vol 4, Week 27 – Oct 29, 2013

October 30, 2013

We had a strong turnout for Tuesday Serial this week: 31 new serial installments for your reading pleasure. Congratulations to Andy Goldman for concluding his long-running The Only City Left this week! But with three debuts, you have several choices for your new favorite:

No matter what genres you love, there’s something for you in this week’s offerings. If you’d rather read only completed serials, you’ll find some in our Graduates section (above). In our Hall of Fame, you can find serials that have been subsequently published – make an author happy and go buy one! As always, if you have questions, just let us know!

WRITERS: Do you have news to share in next week’s report? Have an idea for a guest blog post? Did your serial get published? Have some other news for everyone? Shoot us an e.mail (tuesdayserial@tuesdayserial.com) or a DM (@tuesdayserial) so we can share the good news!

As always, if you happen to spot any mistakes or broken links in this week’s TuesdaySerial report, let us know! Happy reading (and writing!).


This linky list is now closed.

 

#TuesdaySerial Report – Vol 4, Week 26 – Oct 22, 2013

October 24, 2013

We had a strong turnout for Tuesday Serial this week: 33 new serial installments for your reading pleasure. This includes a debut by G Taylor, a debut by the writing duo Kat O’Connor and Michael Coorlim, as well as two debuts by the prolific Daniel Whyte III. We also have a conclusion by Emily Ann Imes of her serial “The Dealey Five (Dvorak)“.

No matter what genres you love, there’s something for you in this week’s offerings. If you’d rather read only completed serials, you’ll find some in our Graduates section (above). In our Hall of Fame, you can find serials that have been subsequently published – make an author happy and go buy one! As always, if you have questions, just let us know!

We also have a special guest post this week by Beth Raymond: “Serial Fiction: Three Things I’ll Do Differently Next Time.” Please stop by and check it out.

WRITERS: Do you have news to share in next week’s report? Have an idea for a guest blog post? Did your serial get published? Have some other news for everyone? Shoot us an e.mail (tuesdayserial@tuesdayserial.com) or a DM (@tuesdayserial) so we can share the good news!

As always, if you happen to spot any mistakes or broken links in this week’s TuesdaySerial report, let us know! Happy reading (and writing!).


This linky list is now closed.

 

“Serial Fiction: Three Things I’ll Do Differently Next Time” by Beth Raymond

October 24, 2013

We are pleased to welcome Tuesday Serial contributor Beth Raymond to the Tuesday Serial site today for the fourth installment in our guest post series. We will be featuring guest posts every other week through December 20. You can view previous posts in the series hereWelcome, Beth!


Secrets_of_the_Conclave_coverLast year, I began publishing my first serial, Secrets of the Conclave at JukePop Serials. Since then, I’ve learned a thing or two about the process of writing serials. While I’m by no means an expert, here are the top three things I’ll do differently the next time—and if you’re new to writing serial fiction, these are things you should consider doing from the start.

#1: Write a Continuous Story.

Secrets of the Conclave began its life as a novel, and I wrote each chapter from the perspective of one of four, rotating point-of-view characters. Yet as a serial, this format meant literally months would pass before a reader learned what happened next for certain characters. That led to reader confusion and a need for me to add more backstory than I’d intended to new chapters.

Therefore, the next time, I’ll write a continuous story. By “continuous,” I mean a story that flows, chapter by chapter, from the point of view of a single character or multiple characters in the same time and place. A continuous story will help readers remain engaged over time because they won’t have to struggle to remember what I’ve already written—even if it’s been a while since my last installment.

#2: Publish at Least Once per Week.

Speaking of delays between installments, dedicated readers of Secrets of the Conclave have put up with my somewhat inconsistent publishing schedule. I try to publish a new chapter every two weeks, but sometimes the delay stretches longer, and I’m certain I’ve lost readers as a result. Consequently, publishing a new installment at least once per week is another thing I’ll do differently the next time.

Sticking to a one-per-week-minimum schedule reduces the risk of losing readers through neglect and attrition. If my readers know that I will post new content every Saturday, then they are more likely to incorporate my publishing schedule into their reading schedule. I could then publish extra chapters every now and then on off-days as a bonus for my loyal readers.

#3: Keep Installments (Relatively) Short.

Because I’ll be publishing more frequently the next time, I also plan to keep each new installment relatively short. Unlike Secrets of the Conclave, where the first chapter is 4300 words long and the rest vary between 2000-3000 words, each installment of my next serial will contain around 1500 words.

Let’s face it: no one likes to read a long wall of text on a screen, and shorter installments are more palatable to busy readers. Even if a reader intends to return to my serial when she has more time, she may forget or later decide to move on to something else. That’s a reader I might have otherwise retained had I only broken up my story into smaller chunks. Plus, given my busy schedule, short installments might be the only realistic way for me to publish something new at least once per week.

By doing these three things differently for my next serial project, I hope to have greater success in attracting and retaining readers. If you’re just getting started, consider incorporating these ideas into your process from the very beginning and see where they take you!


beth raymondBeth Raymond is a lawyer and author of speculative fiction. When she’s not writing or working, she enjoys traveling, playing video games, pretending she can paint acrylics, and putting things in order. Samples of her writing and random musings can be found on her website. Beth lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband.